Late Night Library

Archives about Amanda McConnon

Aracelis Girmay – the black maria

agirmay_authorphoto_credit-sheila-griffin

How does one write a book of poems that deals with the unspeakable suffering that history, its people and its events, have brought onto innocent lives, without perpetuating that trauma? the black maria, by Aracelis Girmay (BOA Editions) doesn’t evade tragedy. There is suffering here: that of the thousands who have attempted the journey to

continue reading →

April 25, 2016

Charlotte Pence – Many Small Fires

Pence_Photo_Color-1

At the core of Many Small Fires (Black Lawrence Press) is a harmony, but not one we usually think of. Here, oneness is born not out of ephemeral ideas like peace and love, but out of hard fact: we are all of a singular species, one that evolution allowed to come together as our ape-like

continue reading →

November 23, 2015

“Both microscope and telescope.” A conversation with Matthew Wimberley

20150727_BW_Wimberley

Matt Wimberley and I met in the MFA at NYU, where our shared love of modern American folk music made grounds for a poet friendship I value highly – he could often be found in the sitting room of the writer’s house listening to the kinds of bands that sing about landscapes and people across

continue reading →

July 27, 2015

Writing Towards Home: A conversation with Susan Denning

DENNING2-1

How to Live Forever approaches the everyday in a way that celebrates it without mythologizing it. In these poems, we’re treated to a fresh take on often domestic scenes that veer slightly towards fantastical without crossing a line of no return. It’s a world in which we are allowed to find joy in normal occurrences without

continue reading →

April 27, 2015

“They deserve to be heard.” In conversation with Christine Heppermann

CHRISTINE H

In “The Woods,” the first poem in Poisoned Apples: Poems for You, My Pretty (Greenwillow Books), Christine Heppermann asks, “Where are the fairy tales about gym class / or the doctor’s office or the back of the bus / where bad things also happen?” Much of the rest of the book serves as the answer.

continue reading →

December 1, 2014

“I lose my bearings, happily, in the face of it”: A conversation with Sasha Steensen

Steensen_IMG_0144

Early on in Sasha Steensen’s House of Deer (Fence Books, 2014), she writes, “as you know, unspoken thoughts rot.” It is this awareness of the natural and inevitable patterns that we are subject to, despite the human way we manipulate our futures based on our values and desires, that makes this book worth reading. By

continue reading →

August 4, 2014

Newsletter powered by MailChimp