Late Night Library

Archives about debut

Mona Awad – 13 Ways of Looking at a Fat Girl

Mona Awad’s debut novel, 13 Ways of Looking at a Fat Girl (Penguin Books) is a fascinating study of relationships and the interactions of daily life. Told from varying points of view, each chapter traces the shifting power dynamics between mother and daughter, woman and lover, customer and salesperson. Each encounter, even the careless comment

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March 7, 2016

Alexandra Kleeman – You Too Can Have a Body Like Mine

I opened the refrigerator and saw nothing but a pile of stripped oranges, a pyramid of them, all the pale yellow color of rind. They would be so easy to eat—pre-peeled, unarmored. The little gouges in their rinds matched the diameter of B’s fingernails exactly. But for some reason oranges now filled me with dread.

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August 24, 2015

“The world of Kitchens is all around me.” A conversation with J. Ryan Stradal

One of the things that Eva hated the most about being a kid was how everyone always told her that childhood was the best time of their entire lives, and don’t grow up too fast, and enjoy those carefree days while you can. In those moments, her body felt like the world’s smallest prison, and

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August 10, 2015

“There are stakes greater than death.” An interview with Christina Stoddard

Forgive the hand to mouth, Your prayers will blanket the heavens like ash. Some of your mistakes are forgivable. You’re not the one who gets to decide.” –from “Some Ungodly Hour,” Hive (University of Wisconsin Press) In Hive, the debut poetry collection from Christina Stoddard rituals of religion and violence often intermingle. Narrated in the voice of

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August 3, 2015

“It keeps us awake at night longer than it should.” A conversation with Shane Hinton

Here’s the thing about trash: it grows. You can be arrested one day, taken to the county jail, and the next day, as soon as you get back, it’s a whole new ballgame, trash-wise. It never stops coming. Martin and Louis can take short naps, but the pickup trucks roll through the gates, the weight

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June 15, 2015

“The subjectivity of the world is endlessly interesting.” A conversation with Megan Kruse

In Portland writer Megan Kruse’s debut novel, Call Me Home (Hawthorne Books), love and danger often seem inextricable. All three main characters—close siblings Jackson and Lydia, along with their mother Amy—find that love may lead them far away from home or safety. When Amy makes a choice to flee her abusive husband, she carries the

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April 20, 2015

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