Late Night Library

Archives about Emily Choate

Kaitlyn Greenidge – We Love You, Charlie Freeman

In the opening pages of Kaitlyn Greenidge’s fascinating debut novel, We Love You, Charlie Freeman (Algonquin Books), we meet the Freemans at a moment of uncertain change. They’re a loving family that has developed idiosyncratic ways of communicating with one another. Sisters Charlotte and Callie share a constant secretive back-and-forth of sign language. Their mother

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April 18, 2016

Lee Smith : Dimestore

Over the course of her distinguished career, Lee Smith has shown time and again that narrative is the fuel that powers her, both as a writer and as a person. With her new book, Dimestore: A Writer’s Life (Algonquin Books), Smith has brought her considerable drive for storytelling into the realm of memoir for the

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March 21, 2016

David Armand: The Gorge

David Armand

In the opening scenes of The Gorge, a new novel by Louisiana writer David Armand (Southeast Missouri State University Press) the far reaches of a sunken cave create an ominous presence that fuels the novel’s dark tone. At any point, The Gorge feels likely to break out into eruptions of brutality, or to stoke its

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October 5, 2015

Ellen Urbani – Landfall

Ellen Urbani’s debut novel Landfall pits two adolescent girls against myriad dangers, both physical and psychological, all set in motion by the disastrous experience of Hurricane Katrina. Drawing from harrowing events documented about post-Katrina New Orleans and her own experience in the treatment of trauma survivors, Urbani follows Rose and Rosy as they navigate the

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September 7, 2015

“There are stakes greater than death.” An interview with Christina Stoddard

Forgive the hand to mouth, Your prayers will blanket the heavens like ash. Some of your mistakes are forgivable. You’re not the one who gets to decide.” –from “Some Ungodly Hour,” Hive (University of Wisconsin Press) In Hive, the debut poetry collection from Christina Stoddard rituals of religion and violence often intermingle. Narrated in the voice of

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August 3, 2015

“The subjectivity of the world is endlessly interesting.” A conversation with Megan Kruse

In Portland writer Megan Kruse’s debut novel, Call Me Home (Hawthorne Books), love and danger often seem inextricable. All three main characters—close siblings Jackson and Lydia, along with their mother Amy—find that love may lead them far away from home or safety. When Amy makes a choice to flee her abusive husband, she carries the

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April 20, 2015

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